The Daily Star

You might think it would take a lot to upstage an artist like Damien Hirst, but earlier this year Chawky Frenn did so with ease. A relatively unknown Lebanese painter who works in a decidedly unhip hyperrealist style, Frenn caused a minor ruckus with an exhibition at New Hampshire's Dartmouth College in the United States.

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Bethesda Gazette

A group of powerfully conceived works by artist Chawky Frenn, now at the Fraser Gallery in Bethesda , is strong stuff -- even for the most seasoned viewer.

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The Washington Post

MORE SO EVEN THAN his abstract brethren, the representational painter who doesn't bring a healthy dose of self-consciousness to his trade these days runs the risk of being labeled a dinosaur: corny, unhip and irrelevant.

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Washington City Paper

On a bookshelf in his Arlington apartment, painter Chawky Frenn keeps an expansive collection of disembodied baby-doll heads. The weathered porcelain noggins lean on one another in a carefully balanced heap, some of them upside down and eyeless, others staring out at Frenn's studio beneath cracked brows. In their midst, almost too inconspicuous to spot, is a pair of human skulls, one of them not much larger than a baseball.

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The Dartmouth

The Hopkins Center curates new art exhibits all the time, but rarely has one spawned the strong reactions and growing discussion as the paintings of Chawky Frenn shown in the Upper Jewitt Corridor by the Courtyard Café.

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Concord Monitor

One of the arresting canvases in Chawky Frenn's show at The Art Center in Hargate at St. Paul's School in Concord is a self-portrait which he calls "The Scream." It's 6 feet long, nearly 3 feet tall, larger than life-size to accommodate the self-portrait of his head on the left, skull facing him on the right. The two images look at each other, Frenn's veins bulging, both mouths agape, across a void of black. Despite the title, despite the rage, the center of the canvas aches with silence.

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Erie Times-News

Of the many disturbingly memorable images rendered by painter Chawky Frenn currently on exhibit at the Erie Art Museum, one has achieved a particular, haunting prescience since Sept. 11: "National Interest vs. Human Rights" depicts the Statue of Liberty surrounded by cloud-like skulls, more skulls skulking beneath her robes, and a hand reaching desperately out from her tablet. It's prescient because, despite its relevance to current events, Frenn painted the piece in 1993.

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NY Arts

In the final analysis, artists have only one tool at their command - their minds. All their works are to be estimated according to the capabilities they possess for the cogency of compelling and incisive thought and the extent to which that thought is infused into their work. Everything else they employ are merely means to their ends - mechanisms that are pointless without a point having been given. The brush is a broom, the chisel a hatchet, paint is a stain, stone is stone and clay is mud - the found object is junk pulled form the trash, video a shadow coiling on a wall and film the flickering of an indecisive flame - until a meaning is injected into this merest stuff of the earth. The value is in what gets said, for art is, tin the end, an intellectual enterprise.

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Art New England

The art of Chawky Frenn is the real thing. In this exhibit's thirty-four exquisitely rendered oil paintings, Frenn faces the essential issues of our existence. His works are filled with images that find us forever positioned between the contending forces of life and death, good and evil, and religious faith and the despair of damnation.

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The New York Times

Chawky Frenn is a painter who has nailed down the figurative mode, and this accomplishment gives him the license to convey anything he wants, including the grand theme: the elusive meaning of human existence.

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Connecticut Post

The often-painful struggle to find meaning in a modern world that's caught between good and evil is the subject of a dramatic exhibition that comes to Bridgeport later this week. "Ecce Homo: Paintings of Chawky Frenn," an exhibit of 39 works, opens Friday at the Housatonic Museum of Art, where it will remain on view through July 20.

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

When Lebanese-American artist Chawky Frenn was a visiting instructor at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, he dropped by the Hoyt Institute of Fine Arts in New Castle one day, unannounced, to show his work to executive director Kimberly Koller-Jones.

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